Movie highlights need for Florida alimony reform

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It is no secret to Orlando residents that the current state alimony laws can have a seriously negative impact on those who are ordered to pay. When alimony reform was being bandied about last year, several people shared their stories of financial hardship as a result of large alimony payments. However, although the Florida legislature passed reforms, Governor Rick Scott vetoed the bill.

However, those who are pro-reform have not given up the fight. One of the latest methods being used to educate the public on the issues of alimony reform is the documentary, “Divorce Corp.” It highlights the problems with the current policies and explains why reform is necessary.

However, although the process might need an overhaul, the principle of alimony is still valid. Payments to spouses who gave up jobs or careers in order to take care of their families deserve to be compensated for the time they put into their families. Alimony ensures that a spouse will not live in poverty after a divorce. But the problem with the current laws is that the spouse who is paying alimony could find themselves in financial straits.

New attempts at legislation will avoid the pitfalls of the 2013 proposed legislation. For example, new legislation will not seek to eliminate permanent alimony, but will focus on smaller fixes such as alerting both spouses that their standard of living will decrease after a divorce. Pro-reformists will also seek “retirement” of alimony payments when the payee retires.

No one argues that alimony is a needed part of the divorce process. However, opponents of the current system want the process to be less financially prohibitive for the payee. Anyone who feels they are paying unfairly can seek the advice of an experienced legal professional who can evaluate their situation and offer solutions that can make paying alimony less of a financial burden.

Source: Bradenton.com, “Florida alimony reform supporters rally around documentary film” Kathleen McGrory, Jan. 22, 2014

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