Eliot Spitzer and wife file high asset divorce

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When 26 years of marriage come to an end, you might expect emotional discussions and some contention in division of property. When that marriage ends after at least one incident of infidelity, most Florida residents would expect to see a bit of a courtroom fight. According to statements issued by Eliot Spitzer and his wife, there will be no celebrity drama attached to theirhigh asset divorce, which was filed recently.

The couple issued a joint statement following the filing of divorce paperwork. According to the statement, all issues have been resolved between the two and the divorce is uncontested. This is despite the fact that the divorce was marked contested by the court system.

There are facts in the marriage that would lead some spouses to attempt to get the most out of divorce proceedings. First, there is the wealth involved. Eliot Spitzer is worth a billion dollars. From 2011 through 2012, tax records indicate he made $5 million from real estate investments. He made several more million in television work and drew money from his engineering company.

Spitzer’s wife is not without her own worth, though. She is the successful head of an equity firm. Although she might not need Spitzer’s money, some might think she deserves a large cut of the pie. Six years ago, Spitzer resigned as governor of another state after a scandal involving a prostitute. Despite his public infidelity, Wall stood by him.

The divorce was filed in December, following at least six months of separation. During Spitzer’s failed run as controller, he never appeared at any function with his wife, leaving the media and public suspicious that trouble was brewing. The couple has kept their marriage as private as possible, and that includes the divorce.

According to reports, a deal was struck between the two, but no details have been released. That Spitzer and his wife can come to a civil agreement that allows both parties to move forward is a solid example for others. No matter what your level of wealth or past problems are, working together on property division or other legal issues may get you a more desirable result in the end.

Source: New York Daily News, “EXCLUSIVE: Eliot Spitzer and longtime wife Silda Wall file divorce papers” Barbara Ross, Brian Niemietz and Dareh Gregorian, Jan. 16, 2014

Try working together to make your divorce less expensive

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Spouses that have spent more than a handful of years together often find themselves in heated divorces because of what they have. She wants the house, he wants the car, and neither of them can agree on anything. Married couples in Orlando, Florida, are often surprised to find out how much they own together, even though they have let years go by and have spent all of that time buying this and collecting that. Some have purchased real estate; others own businesses that have been developing since the beginning or possibly even before the marriage. Whatever the property is, their values are often the source of serious contention in a high asset divorce.

This isn’t how it has to be, though. A couple can choose to work together during the split to make sure that both parties have what they need to survive and adapt to life without one another. One of the avenues that a couple can use to achieve this is the collaborative process. The name of the process speaks for itself: collaboration. Former couples work on a divorce settlement that is adequate for both of them with the help of attorneys, financial planners and other experts. As long as the couple chooses not to head to court, these professionals can help the spouses come to a mutual agreement instead of fighting it out through litigation.

Choosing this route often leaves the former couple happier for a number of reasons. First, the process is usually less time-consuming than a litigated divorce. Second, the ex-spouses are often more satisfied with the outcome since they have control of the provisions of the agreement, rather than a third-party judge who has no personal involvement with the relationship. In some cases, couples who have chosen collaborative divorce have found that there is no arguing at all. This means the divorce is less stressful and the couple can part as amicably as possible, given the circumstances.

Source: Tampa Tribune, “Kinder, gentler divorces take the bite out of break-ups” Ray Reyes, Sep. 15, 2013